Home Living Today Culture Matt Walsh: Dear parents, there is absolutely no good reason to buy your child a smart phone

Matt Walsh: Dear parents, there is absolutely no good reason to buy your child a smart phone

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I was in an airport a few weeks ago when I noticed an interesting scene. A mother and her young son — he looked to be about 9 or 10 – were sitting on the seat across from me, both looking at their phones. Mom apparently was having some trouble with the reception on hers, so she asked to borrow her son’s phone. He gave it to her, and that’s when she asked a rather shocking question: “What’s your passcode?”

Not only did this prepubescent child have a phone, not only was it password protected, but his mom didn’t even know the password. Could there be a better illustration of modern “parenting”?

I thought of this exchange when I read the article just published in the Atlantic, arguing that the current generation of adolescents are being destroyed by their iPhone addictions. We’ve all heard these arguments before, but, seeing as we haven’t done anything to fix the problem, we probably need to hear them again. As the author explains, kids today are isolated and anti-social. They don’t do anything but stare at their phones all day. They’re lethargic. They’re unhappy. Rates of adolescent suicide and depression are skyrocketing, and it is not a coincidence that this spike has occurred in direct correlation with smart phones becoming a household item for kids.

Yes, they’re less likely than previous generations to engage in physically risky behavior, but that’s because they don’t leave their homes. They are utterly immersed in the world behind the screen, and it is changing everything about them. The way they think, communicate, relate. Even their postures are being disfigured because they spend so much time looking down. Their priorities have changed most of all, mainly in the fact that they have none. They don’t crave independence, which used to be a defining characteristic of young people. They aren’t itching to get their driver’s license like we were. They just want to be on their phones.

I was in an airport a few weeks ago when I noticed an interesting scene. A mother and her young son — he looked to be about 9 or 10 – were sitting on the seat across from me, both looking at their phones. Mom apparently was having some trouble with the reception on hers, so she asked to borrow her son’s phone. He gave it to her, and that’s when she asked a rather shocking question: “What’s your passcode?”

Not only did this prepubescent child have a phone, not only was it password protected, but his mom didn’t even know the password. Could there be a better illustration of modern “parenting”?

I thought of this exchange when I read the article just published in the Atlantic, arguing that the current generation of adolescents are being destroyed by their iPhone addictions. We’ve all heard these arguments before, but, seeing as we haven’t done anything to fix the problem, we probably need to hear them again. As the author explains, kids today are isolated and anti-social. They don’t do anything but stare at their phones all day. They’re lethargic. They’re unhappy. Rates of adolescent suicide and depression are skyrocketing, and it is not a coincidence that this spike has occurred in direct correlation with smart phones becoming a household item for kids.

Yes, they’re less likely than previous generations to engage in physically risky behavior, but that’s because they don’t leave their homes. They are utterly immersed in the world behind the screen, and it is changing everything about them. The way they think, communicate, relate. Even their postures are being disfigured because they spend so much time looking down. Their priorities have changed most of all, mainly in the fact that they have none. They don’t crave independence, which used to be a defining characteristic of young people. They aren’t itching to get their driver’s license like we were. They just want to be on their phones.

 

 

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